Right on time

Week before last I headed east for my annual trip to the excellent dog show in Jackson, Mississippi.  After a long day of driving I had been thinking that I was going to get to Jackson much later than I had planned.  Actually, I was right on time to see a lovely sunset over the Mississippi River in Vicksburg.  And, for a bonus, a river barge being pushed down the river slid by while I was making pictures.  I wasn’t late at all!

IMG_9251

IMG_9254

IMG_9250

The not a mystery anymore building

Bentley and I have been enjoying a few days in Jackson MS at the wonderful dog show they host each September.  Or rather I should say that I have ben enjoying this time as Bentley would just as soon be home sleeping on the sofa! I had planned several outings, but other than one cemetery chasing excursion the time just hasn’t permitted any exploring.  Plus it has either rained or threatened to rain every day and exploring isn’t permitted in the rain!

However, all is not lost as I did find something that gave me the feeling of a little exploring.  I had noticed a building on the Fair Grounds that just seemed to call to me to come see what it was.  It was old and appeared to have some gothic features like a church, but had some Art Deco lines, too.  So this evening Bentley and I walked down there, camera in hand. (Just to digress here I have to share that Bentley got his first glimpse of a horse as they were having a horse show at the equine center.  It wasn’t too close, but he did stop and  stare at it and I had to chuckle because I knew he was thinking that it was a very large dog!)

IMG_1271_edited-1.jpg

There was absolutely no identification on the building other than the number 21 on the side indicating that it is a part of the Fair Grounds complex.  What could this be? It looked like a church, but it had an eagle and an emblem with stars above the door, like a Federal building.  Some windows intact others not.  Door boarded up.  No corner stone. No identification.

img_1279_edited-1

Around the building we go (this is where Bentley meets the horse), but still no clues except the folding seating.  Perhaps this building is being used for storage?  Let’s go look through those holes in the door and see.  Creepy, but I had to go.  Yes, it is being used for storage and it does appear to be a very big room with plenty of light from the windows.  Along the far wall I could see what appeared to be the remaining framework of arena type seating.

Around the back and a quick peak at the other side showed no cornerstone or identification, just more of the same and more stadium seats.  My mind is whirling and I’m remembering all the things I’ve read about old buildings being torn down on the Fair Ground property and the ongoing preservation, but still can’t figure this one out.  But I love a mystery building and this one will suffice to fulfil my exploration needs!

So, what is it?  I’ll tell you, but you’ll have to read all about it on Doorway Into the Past when I get it aly l sorted out.  So for now, all I’ll tell you is that…it is the old Hinds County Armory!

Capitol Glass

IMG_0847_edited-1.jpg
Rotunda dome in the House of Representatives

 

I’ve always loved stained glass whether it is in a church or a public building.  Just like with quilts it is the colors and shapes that pull my eyes to it.  I don’t know which came first – my love of quilts or my love of stained glass.  I see quilts in stained glass and I see stained glass in quilts!

IMG_0840.JPG
Panels on the lower circumference of the rotunda dome in the Senate Chamber

 

On my recent trip I visited the (New) Mississippi State Capitol twice.  The first time I did the self-guided tour and afterwards realized that I needed the guided tour to see everything, so I returned again at a time when I could catch the tour.  I’m so glad I did because this building and its stained glass is something to behold!

IMG_0844.JPG

This is the ceiling of one of the hallways.  I knew I would fall on my face if I tried to walk while looking up, so I just stopped!

These three panels at the top of the Capitol’s main staircase recently were removed and underwent an extensive renovation.  I vaguely remember seeing them on a previous visit to the Capitol in December 2002 and they were rather dull.  They still caught my eye and I commented on them to my Dad and he agreed that they were quite impressive.  There were a lot of people in the Capitol that day so I couldn’t get too close.

IMG_0835

These three panels were designed by Louise Millet of Chicago and are located on the first landing of the grand staircase. They represent three iconic figures of the state: the American Indian, Mississippi, and the pioneer.  They were hard to photograph because of their location, but I did get this detail of the pioneer – isn’t he still handsome after all these  years?

A little Art Deco

IMG_0701.JPG

Here’s just a little Art Deco to brighten your Thursday!

Sadly, the building this light goes with is sitting empty and abandoned, awaiting help.  There are four of these delightful fixtures around the building that, in my opinion, needs to be saved while it’s still in good condition.

Wednesday 09.23.2015

IMG_9290

On my recent fast trip to Jackson I spent a little time on the grounds of the New Capitol (yes, folks still refer to it as the “New” Capitol even though it is over 100 years old).

This is the figurehead from the second USS Mississippi (Battleship #23).  The keel was laid down in 1904 and the ship launched in 1905; she was commissioned in 1908 and served the US Navy until 1914 when she and her sister ship, the USS Idaho, were sold to Greece.  She would meet her demise during WWII. The figurehead was removed and presented to the State of Mississippi in 1909 and now graces a part of the Capitol lawn.

Seeing the figurehead reminded me of 2 things almost simultaneously.  I remembered looking at this on a visit to the New Capitol in late 2002 with my parents.  Daddy and I looked at it and shared a chuckle about the “No Parking” sign;  I’m still not sure why that is there!  I also remembered reading is a nice post on Misspreservation about the figurehead.  Click over there to see a picture of the battleship with the figurehead attached. It was very graceful on the bow of the big ship!

I’m glad this piece of art and military history has been preserved.  I know it was designed for outdoor use, but still it is quite elderly.  I hope when the time comes that dear citizens will rally around to take steps to keep it in good condition so others can admire the eagle and the 13 stars she protects!